Did you see that in the woods just now? I think I saw the board game Cryptid.

Have ye heard the tale? A board game that wanders into town at night searching for lost tokens. Collecting them. Adding them to its box. And wandering off into the night? It is a tale as old as time, and yet no one has seen this board game.

No one, that is, until now.

Continue reading “Did you see that in the woods just now? I think I saw the board game Cryptid.”

And the award for best thematic board game goes to…

In university, I took Marketing 101 as an elective. I enjoyed the subject, but I enjoyed the girls more. Which sounds incredibly chauvinistic. And is. But after four years into my IT degree, it was like an oasis in an otherwise barren landscape.

One of the first things we learnt in the course was cars. And the difference between how they’re valued. You have your mass market cars: cheap to make, cheap to buy, and the idea is that they sell as many as possible with a small margin. Then you have your exclusive cars: they’re more expensive to make, and the margin is a lot higher. Meaning you don’t have to create or sell as many. Because of this you’re no longer buying a car but an experience of exclusivity; a status symbol.

Ridiculous right? What vapid person would buy something based purely on exclusivity?

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Underleague: The Game PETA Doesn’t Want You To Play

We have a problem. Board games are too family friendly.They’re becoming the MCU. And while the MCU has produced some great action movies like Captain America: Winter Soldier, and Avengers: Infinity War. They’re sanitized. Sometimes that’s fine, but sometimes you want your action movies to be visceral. Sometimes you want The Raid. This was my expectation going into a game where the front cover has a blood drenched metal spider ripping the FREAKING head off a giant rat.

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Letters from Whitechapel: Do not open!

Letters from Whitechapel box art. A shadowy figure standing above Whitechapel blueprints.

It’s Halloween. By now everyone has had their fill of pumpkin spice lattes and reviews and playthroughs of Mysterium. For me, I’m opening a blood drenched box holding a half-eaten human kidney and a letter that reads:

From hell.

Mr Lusk,
Sor
I send you half the Kidne I took from one women prasarved it for you tother piece I fried and ate it was very nise. I may send you the bloody knif that took it out if you only wate a whil longer
signed
Catch me when you can Mishter Lusk

Which is weird, because my name’s David.

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Tips on Writing Board Game Reviews

This article strongly references my website, though I think it contains a few nuggets of gold for those interested in reviewing board games, or anything else.

When I started Roll to Review it was on the ambitious premise of fixing the three big issues that I saw within board game media:

  • Reviewers spending too much time describing how to play the game, and not enough actual feedback.
    • As a reader I didn’t want to know how to play the game, but whether it was good or not, and why.
  • Reviewers overstating the importance of components.
    • Components are a necessity and if they’re not terrible I’m fine with them. They should in all honesty be the least exciting part of a board game, so why does talking about them take up so much gosh darn space.
  • Reviewers are way too positive, with hardly anyone daring to give negative reviews.
    • This is great for building and creating a community, as there isn’t any interest in bad reviews. The problem is that it’s so widespread within board game media it makes it hard for me to trust reviewers’ opinions.

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Back from the Depths Lovecraft Letter

This blog isn’t Marvel. We know this because I’m flat broke, and it doesn’t take a year to get a sequel. A couple weeks ago I reviewed Love Letter, and this week I’m back in the expanded Love Letter universe to review Lovecraft Letter. Although there are many flavours of the original game, Lovecraft Letter is the only version that revisits and re-implements core design of the game. It’s a 2-6 player game designed by Seiji Kanai and published by AEG.

Roll-to-review-board-game-lovecraft-letter-box-front

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On the Chopping Block: Click Clack Lumberjack

Roll-to-Review-Board-Game-Click-Clack Lumberjack-box-artI’ve hit the point that every board game collector, and hoarder, hits where their collection outgrows their space. Therefore, I’m introducing a new type of review called On the Chopping Block – inspired by Click Clack Lumberjack – where I look at games that will be sold off. These aren’t necessarily bad games, but games that have either been outshone by other games or are not a good fit for me. Heck, we’ll see some games I really enjoy but I’m going to sell because I can’t see myself reaching for it from the shelf. Let’s begin by introducing the first game on the chopping block: Click Clack Lumberjack designed by Justin Oh and published by Mayday Games.

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My Love Letter to Love Letter

There are a few games in my collection where the review is a bigger story than just one solitary review. For instance, I wanted to review Lovecraft Letter but to do that I need to establish my thoughts on the original. Otherwise we’d be skipping forward to seeing Neo being The One, without understanding what the Matrix is. Although to be fair, even after three movies, and a mini anthology, I’m still not sure that I know. By the end of this review, you’ll hopefully be in a better place than I, so without further ado introducing Love Letter: Premium Edition a 2-8 player game designed by Seiji Kanai and published by AEG – for now.

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CrossTalk: The Hip New Party Game You Should Be Talking About

 

Roll-To-Review-board-game-CrossTalk-Cover

There’s an old joke: a Freudian slip is when you say one thing but mean your mother. I feel like this encapsulates what CrossTalk is all about, you’re trying to get your team to guess the meaning of the word in vague yet creative ways. It’s a team-based party word game where you need to pick your words carefully, and your team carefully-er. Designed by Brett Sobol, Seth Van Orden and published by Nauvoo Games, let’s see how it rates.

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