Welcome to the Dungeon!

The unfortunate side effect of playing too much Guitar Hero in 2005 is that I can no longer say Welcome to the Dungeon without following with: we got fun and games. This week we’re going back to an old favourite, and a real turning point in my board game career. Where I turned from the lovable casual hobbyist into the board game consuming monster who writes this blog. The game that started it all is the fantastic and wonderful Welcome to the Dungeon, designed by Masato Uesugi, and published by IELLO. Beware that reading further will lure you deeper into the amazing world of board gaming. You’ve been warned.

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Back from the Depths Lovecraft Letter

This blog isn’t Marvel. We know this because I’m flat broke, and it doesn’t take a year to get a sequel. A couple weeks ago I reviewed Love Letter, and this week I’m back in the expanded Love Letter universe to review Lovecraft Letter. Although there are many flavours of the original game, Lovecraft Letter is the only version that revisits and re-implements core design of the game. It’s a 2-6 player game designed by Seiji Kanai and published by AEG.

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On the Chopping Block: Click Clack Lumberjack

Roll-to-Review-Board-Game-Click-Clack Lumberjack-box-artI’ve hit the point that every board game collector, and hoarder, hits where their collection outgrows their space. Therefore, I’m introducing a new type of review called On the Chopping Block – inspired by Click Clack Lumberjack – where I look at games that will be sold off. These aren’t necessarily bad games, but games that have either been outshone by other games or are not a good fit for me. Heck, we’ll see some games I really enjoy but I’m going to sell because I can’t see myself reaching for it from the shelf. Let’s begin by introducing the first game on the chopping block: Click Clack Lumberjack designed by Justin Oh and published by Mayday Games.

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My Love Letter to Love Letter

There are a few games in my collection where the review is a bigger story than just one solitary review. For instance, I wanted to review Lovecraft Letter but to do that I need to establish my thoughts on the original. Otherwise we’d be skipping forward to seeing Neo being The One, without understanding what the Matrix is. Although to be fair, even after three movies, and a mini anthology, I’m still not sure that I know. By the end of this review, you’ll hopefully be in a better place than I, so without further ado introducing Love Letter: Premium Edition a 2-8 player game designed by Seiji Kanai and published by AEG – for now.

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Concept: Party on Wayne

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While other people were out playing worker placement, and abstract games, I was going through a party game phase; deducing who was the murderer in Deception or acting out a scene in Monikers. Whenever I ran into my Mum, she would sigh and say: why can’t you be normal like the other kids. To which I’d reply: damnit Mum, this isn’t a phase, it’s my life! Turns out it was a phase, and one of the games that kicked it off was Concept. This is one of the more recognised party games, and was nominated for both a Spiel Des Jahres, and a Golden Geek. It was designed by Gaëtan Beaujannot, and Alain Rivollet, published by Repos Production, and reviewed by me, Dave Norris.

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NMBR 9: Why was it afraid of 8?

Roll-to-review-board-games-NMBR-9-game-boxI can’t say the name of this board game without thinking about Fatman Scoop, drop the plant, Fatman Scoop, drop the plant, Fatman Scoop, drop the plant, give it up give it up give it up. Always a laugh whenever radio stations go overboard cleaning up profane songs. Anyway, engine, engine NMBR 9 is a 1-4 player spatial puzzle game designed by Peter Wichmann and published by Z-man Games.

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Smile Review: Smile like you mean it

Roll-to-review-board-game-cover-artEver notice how the meanest games have the nicest names? Smile, Nothing Personal, Dead Last. OK maybe not Dead Last, but you get my point. Smile, is a new implementation of the hit game No Thanks! Which when played with a group adults quickly turns into a game of F**K You. It’s a 3-5 player, reverse auction game, designed by Michael Schacht and published by Z-Man games.
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Jump Drive Review: Start Your Engines!

Roll-to-review-board-game-jump-drive-box-artGiven the Commonwealth Games are 100km away, you’d forgive me for mistaking Jump Drive for a board game about the determination and drive required to become a professional long jumper. Instead, what I found was a baby board game; essentially My First Race for the Galaxy. A 20 minute engine builder for 2-4 players, designed by Tom Lehmann and published by Rio Grande Games.

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Village Pillage Review: Time to Turnip the Heat

It’s 2:00pm Friday, March 16th, 2018. I’m at my desk doing a business, when Janine from the front desk walks through the office with a large wooden crate. Danger, confidential, and top secret are printed in bold red font down the side. She puts it on my desk, complains about her back, and walks off. I wonder what this is, I didn’t have any packages arriving today, did I? People in the surrounding cubicles stand up and apply standard social pressure; anything to break up their 9 to 5.

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Red 7 Review: It’s not Uno

Red-7-Board-Game-Review-Box-artRed 7 is a 2-4 player card game designed by Carl Chudyk and Chris Cieslik and published by Asmadi Games. It’s a card game that’s seen Talladega Nights one too many times, as the rules are simple: if you’re not first you’re last. If at the end of your turn you’re not winning, you’re eliminated, with the winner being the last player still standing.

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