Azul Review

Roll-to-Review-board-game-Azul-box-coverIf you’re like me and thought all board games are abstract, well, you’re both right and wrong. The term abstract game is now a genre term that reasonably means the game contains minimal luck, usually two players, and little to no theme. Think of Chess and Checkers as prime examples of abstracts, or more recently Azul. A 2-4 player abstract game designed by Michael Kiesling and published by Plan B games.

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Where the Heck is the Friday Post?

Dave Collinson is getting married in nine days. If you don’t know of him, he’s pretty cool. He’s an artist who’s done some work on board games, has his own board game called Lumberjerks, and a game he’s been working on just recently came out of early access called Damsel. If you haven’t heard of him till now, do yourself a favour and checkout his portfolio here.

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Vampires Vs. Unicorns: Floor War

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One of the reasons I love board games is how diverse they are. Already on this blog we’ve reviewed a board game which has you picking up sticks in Go Cuckoo, a tight-knit two player game where you’re wheeling and dealing with geishas in Hanamikoji, and a story driven game about being trapped on a desert island in Robinson Crusoe. Today we review another game that pushes the boundaries of tabletop games by removing the tabletop. I was provided a free copy of the newly Kickstarted floortop board game called Vampires vs. Unicorns: Floor War.

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Exploding Kittens Review

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I’m obviously a dog person, so the thought of blowing up some baby cats has some appeal. Combined with my affinity for Oatmeal’s artwork and humour, and my intense love for small box games, Exploding Kittens seemed right up my alley. However, this is a negative review, and I wanted to warn you ahead of time because a lot of people enjoy this board game – which is fine – but I think you will lose that enjoyment once you analyse the game at a certain level. Which is what this review will be doing. As the saying goes, never learn how sausages are made, because you’ll never want to eat a sausage again.

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